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How to Write a Job Posting:

Let’s get right down to work here, and look at exactly what goes into creating a job advertisement that gets noticed on job boards.

1. Use a killer job title.

This is the most important part of your job posting when you’re posting to boards. When you write your title, include the name of the position and the top one to three things that will make the job attractive to an applicant.

2. Add an emotive introduction.

This is a single paragraph that gives three to five details applicants will find most exciting about the job. It is similar to the lede that newspapers use to hook you into reading the full article.

How to Write a Job Posting:

Let’s get right down to work here, and look at exactly what goes into creating a job advertisement that gets noticed on job boards.

1. Use a killer job title.

This is the most important part of your job posting when you’re posting to boards. When you write your title, include the name of the position and the top one to three things that will make the job attractive to an applicant.

2. Add an emotive introduction.

This is a single paragraph that gives three to five details applicants will find most exciting about the job. It is similar to the lede that newspapers use to hook you into reading the full article.

3. Tell your company story.

Information about your company that applicants want to know. How many years you’ve been in business, how long employees stay (if this shows that people stick with you), interesting clients or projects, equipment that applicants will be excited about, awards, accolades, and work culture facts that will interest them.

4. Really sell the position.

Rather than the typical laundry list of bullet points, only include requirements that are essential to this job. Try to limit yourself to one to three things. Then provide information on work hours, pay, interesting coworkers, education opportunities, benefits or perks, and anything else applicants will find interesting.

5. Push your location.

Moving is an obstacle to anyone considering your job that doesn’t live in your region. If you want to attract people from other places, sell applicants on the location. Give them details about schools, activities, crime rates, things to do, etc. If your location is an easy commute from many key hiring areas then make sure to spell out the actual commute time. A candidate will always be keen on a role that can cut their commute by 30 minutes.